Mental Health Care Outreach and Social Media

If you work in the mental health field, you are a natural born communicator. Can we all agree that there is no counseling without a true command of language? After all, psychiatrists, counselors and social workers must all be well versed in BOTH, the spoken and written word to succeed within their chosen career fields.

Counseling sessions are based on active listening skills and the ability to successfully organize and summarize what the client shares. In addition, everything learned from each client session must be converted to accurate, comprehensive and concise progress notes. The data is often admissible in legal proceedings, so the mental health professional must be able to use an economy of words which express a multitude of thoughts and details. Let’s also just remind everyone that professionalism and field credibility also requires neatness, flawless spelling and grammar and attention to proper syntax.

So, where does Social Media enter in to a discussion about listening, thinking, talking, writing and detail orientation?

Social Media Represents the “New World” of Opportunity for Everyone

Social Media is an important form of communication these days. It is becoming a communication tool of choice for many mentally ill clients, especially when they wish to communicate – anonymously – with others to avoid positive

identification and attached stigma. Mental Health professionals are increasingly spending their counseling time instructing their clients in the safe and productive use of Social Media, for this purpose. The chief goal is ALWAYS to protect the vulnerable from exploitation.

The mental health professional is also using Social Media as a way to gain additional professional knowledge as well as to network with others in his own field; including the many that live and work a great distance away.

There are also new opportunities for degree work and certification through online universities and professional organizations, respectively. There are moderated and open forums for career-related discussions on a variety of professional topics developed to advance the field of mental health care.

Plenty of collegial relations and friendships have been forged in the online world, often leading to one-to-one telephone conversations and live meetups. Face-to-face meeting have always been the goal of Social Media, which is designed as an enabler and not a replacement for physical human interaction.

Job information has been exchanged and employment interview offers are often tendered online. And, then there is the research that keeps the mental health care professional up to date on the changes taking places in his field from day to day. Some of the research and anecdotal contributions are the product of practitioners, just like you and me, who choose the Internet as a place to publish our work and share it with the world. We no longer need to wait for third parties to publish what we write.

Forget the Yellow Pages. You Must be Active in Social Media to

Succeed

There is another area in which the worlds of mental health care and Social Media often come together – marketing and outreach. Can any nonprofit or private business afford not to avail themselves of the benefits offered through Social Media? I think not. Why? Because, the collective Social Media audience is huge and diverse. We need the kind of visibility and name recognition that the Internet can lead us to.

Most everyone that we need to connect with is already online, with more and more people showing up daily. Facebook, alone, is already at or nearing 600 million users. Confidently, there is no one on earth that does not know – at least – a single person with a Facebook profile.

Marketing and outreaching others in Social Media need not take a huge amount of resources, either. In fact, the entire effort can be limited to just a few platforms and a limited amount of posts on a consistent basis. This is resource allocation, well positioned.

Are you LinkedIn?

All professionals in any field belong on LinkedIn. Create a profile with your credentials, contact information and over time, as many business references as you can gather. Take some time to join some professional groups and pose and answer career-related questions among the group members. There is a lot to learn from others and much one can share to prove his field expertise. It is such expertise that builds professional credibility and helping relations over time. Such relationships are invaluable when it comes to creating all sorts of professional opportunities including business partnerships, client referrals and employment offers. Do not discount the value of LinkedIn as a premier Social Networking platform for mental health care professionals.

Are you Facebooking?

Facebook is another place where the people we need and wish to “talk” to are a great deal of the time. Sure, it is a place where one must be especially careful not to embarrass himself among his friends or professional colleagues, but it is a place where using good posting discretion can balance the fun with the serious. The common denominator is “value.” Bring value to others and garner their respect and loyalty.

Facebook does have a business side, too. The Facebook business page offers a place to create and foster community, client and professional relations through providing value to some and offering an outlet for others to do the same. A few well placed posts about happenings in the mental health care field on your Facebook business page and a few more quality posts and comments on the pages of others you seek to have an audience with and you are on your way to growing a successful Facebook presence. Just remember that on Social Media, it’s not all about you. Value for others, FIRST. You have the right to pitch your own endeavors about 15% of the time. Do not try and sell in Social Media; work harder to impress. Being respected and liked will get you the opportunities you are looking for.

Have you Blogged, Today?

Blogging is also a great tool to become better known. Show you are an expert in something and share it wherever you can. One or two 400 – 500 word blog posts per week, can quickly establish a professional as an expert that others want to hear from regularly. Invite others to write for your blog, too. Guest bloggers are refreshing and help give the impression that your blog is important enough for others to take the time and contribute to. Their followers will come to read their posts and have a chance to read yours. Often newspaper and magazine writers read the blogs, so don’t be surprised when you receive offers to publish your contributions in their print and online publications. This is good for you and your business, because their readers are probably your own target audience.

When did you last Tweet?

Do you need to tweet? Twitter can be effective if you can develop a targeted and convertible following. Building such a dedicated following takes much work. You want to create a following of credible mental health care gurus; respected field publications; a pool of mainstream field nonprofits and for-profit; federal, state and local government leaders; supportive local businesses and potential client groups. Retweeting others and replying to their tweets is just as important as tweeting your own materials. Again, you must limit tooting your own horn to about 15% of your tweets. Tweet value and seek to connect with others. If you can build relations and take them off-line, you are succeeding.

Are you in Constant Contact with your Primary Audience?

Lastly, look into using an E-mail service such as Constant Contact to keep your audience up to date. Send out a monthly newsletter; issue announcements such as new hires and business expansions; announce your Social Media presence: and even create event invitations and holiday E-cards for your contacts. The more you can get your name in front of others, the better it is remembered. Just don’t overdo it. Strike a balance by using all of your Social Media tools, timely and appropriately.

This is a very exciting time for mental health care professionals. Their appropriate use of Social Media can do many wonderful things for them; their professions; their businesses and organizations; and the clients they serve.

How State Budget Cuts Impact Continuity of Mental Health Care

Continuity of care between the inpatient and outpatient settings continues to be a challenge. Current hospital payments assume that hospitals are actively involved through discharge and the transition to outpatient settings and advocating for payments for outpatient providers to assist in this process is viewed as duplicative. This undermines mental health care providers’ ability to smoothly transition clients between service settings.

Meeting the credentialing requirements for program services and mental health professionals has posed new challenges. Community behavioral health organizations employ professionals that may not meet private insurers’ credentialing standards (for example, 3 years of post-licensure experience). Community providers have addressed this through contractual arrangements in which quality assurance and supervision requirements substitute for these credentialing standards. Services are billed under a supervisory protocol in which the supervising professional’s national provider identifier is used.

Additionally, some programs offer services that rely on a combination of funding sources such as county, state, and private insurers. In these situations, counties sometimes want to limit private insurance clients’ access to these programs because a portion of the overall program is covered by the county.

Impact of State Budget Cuts on Mental Health Care -

In a dramatic turnabout that may foreshadow dilemmas faced by other states, the governor of Minnesota vetoed funding for the state’s mental healthcare program. The legislature would have extended the program for several months, as a compromise was negotiated to retain elements of coverage for the state’s mental health population – a hospital uncompensated care fund, medication/pharmacy, and “coordinated care delivery systems.” In the system, an accountable hospital-centered program paid a fixed amount to cover about 40% of the state’s mental illness population who elected to participate. As there is no reimbursement for outpatient clinic and all non-hospital services, providers and consumers now are scrambling to seek disability determination or enroll in Medicare type coverage after the six month state mental illness coverage enrollment period ends.

While these cuts are only effective as of June 1, 2010, it is expected that they will result in increases to the uncompensated care burden on hospitals and community safety net providers.

How Do We Minimize The Impact of Budget Cuts on Mental Health Care?

Many not-for-profit membership organizations representing community mental health and other service provider agencies throughout Minnesota have been working in coalition with national mental health groups on advocacy related to the state’s mental health program changes. Initially, advocacy efforts were focused on encouraging the state legislature to vote in support of expanding the state Medicaid program early to receive additional federal funding (as provided for in the national healthcare reform bill). Unfortunately, this proved to be politically untenable in the immediate future; however, a measure was passed to allow the governor to use executive authority to expand Medicaid coverage for mental illness patients.

While being actively involved in this advocacy process is vitally important to the community behavioral health system, national mental health advocacy medicaid organizations and their members are also evaluating ways in which they can optimize their business practices to meet this changing budgetary reality. Among other strategies, community behavioral health providers are working to develop partnerships with community hospitals to reduce the number of avoidable emergency department admissions and ease the transition from the inpatient to outpatient settings, supporting clients through the disability determinations process so they may become eligible for Medicaid as quickly as possible, and raising funds that will help to cover the cost sharing requirements for state sponsored mental health care and the enrolled clients that are unable to pay.

Through this two-pronged approach that includes both advocacy and pragmatic business considerations, it is hoped that the community behavioral health system will be able to develop new cost-effective ways of delivering services that will be well-positioned to withstand funding changes while taking advantage of new opportunities made available through national and state health care reform initiatives.

Pitfalls of Using Health Insurance For Mental Health Care

Because of the unfortunate stigma still attached to mental health conditions, people should think twice before using their health insurance to pay for visits to a mental health professional, such a marriage and family therapist, a psychologist or psychiatrist.

If you do have health insurance coverage, your first reaction might be to think, “Well, if I’ve got insurance, why shouldn’t I use it? That’s what it’s there for.” And, most of the time, that’s true. I know I’m certainly grateful for my health insurance when I go to the doctor or dentist.

But it gets more complicated when it comes to mental health care because of negative associations attached to psychological disorders. For example, people probably think differently about an individual who has a physical condition such as a thyroid disorder versus someone who has a psychological condition such as major depression.

The reality is, if you want to get your insurance company to pay for your mental health care, the mental health care provider has to give you a serious psychological diagnosis or the insurance company won’t pay for the treatment.

For instance, many insurance companies won’t pay for someone seeing a therapist for couples counseling or for “normal bereavement” following a loved one’s death. So your mental health care provider needs to find a serious diagnosis that legitimately describes your situation and that will be acceptable to your insurance company. But, once you have that diagnosis, the big issue becomes confidentiality.

Here’s how that works. When you’re seeing a therapist and paying for it yourself, the information you discuss in session stays in the room for the most part. The therapist doesn’t share the information with anyone else, except when they’re required to report child abuse or elder abuse or a handful of other situations covered by law or their profession’s code of ethics. So the vast majority of the time, the information you share with your therapist stays just between the two of you, and you can feel completely free to share all the deep problems that brought you to the therapist’s office in the first place.

However, your sessions won’t be so private any more if your insurance company is paying for all or part of your mental health care, because your diagnosis then becomes part of your health record and it’s no longer confidential. That could be detrimental to you in the future.

For example, let’s say your therapist diagnoses you with major depressive disorder, which is a very common diagnosis. Think about how people view other people who are seriously depressed. They generally have certain expectations of how depressed people behave.

So having that diagnosis in your health record could affect your ability to get a job in the future. It could be an issue in a child custody battle or other legal problems, especially since law enforcement agencies can access your insurance information at any time. A serious mental health diagnosis could cause problems if you tried to obtain other health insurance or life insurance in the future. Those are just a few examples of situations to think about.

The other issue with using insurance benefits for mental health care is that the insurance company might place limitations on the number of sessions you can obtain or require that you get pre-approval from your primary care physician. Some insurance companies are very generous and allow weekly sessions until your problem is resolved, and they don’t interfere very much in the therapeutic process. But some companies place a limit on the number of sessions they’ll cover in a given year, and that frankly might not be enough to resolve some serious or longstanding problems.

But, to me at least, those pragmatic challenges of trying to get your insurance company to provide adequate mental health coverage pale in comparison to the confidentiality issue I was talking about earlier. Confidentiality really is the Number One thing you should consider when you’re deciding whether you want to use your health insurance to cover mental health care.

Renee Haas is a licensed marriage and family therapist and a life coach. She specializes in helping people enhance their relationships, especially doing couples counseling and working with individuals who are having relationship difficulties with a partner, child, parent, boss or other significant people in their lives. She serves therapy clients in California, either in her Moorpark office or via phone or webcam. She works with coaching clients anywhere via phone or web cam.

Suicide Prevention Through Better Mental Health Care

Better mental health care and ease of access :

We need to find ways to make life less difficult for people who struggle with mental illness. No one should have to choose between needed medicine and food or shelter.
We all deserve to have our basic needs met with respect and acceptance. Mental illness is not the person’s fault any more than cancer or heart disease is. This is hard for most of us to understand.
What we see of mental illness is just the tip of the iceberg.

Many more people suffer silently. We can’t see mental illness, it comes to our attention when it is not treated effectively. Sometimes that makes us uncomfortable, and forces us to look at the results of our personal priorities.
Mental health care and suicide prevention should be obvious public health goals. Medicines are getting better and better at keeping depression controlled, but the enjoyment and satisfaction of everyday life is more than just “getting by” emotionally. Suicide means ending your life on purpose. Suicide prevention means making living look better than dying.

Lots of people with depression, and other mental health problems, find new lives with the right mental health care. Others don’t have the same opportunities.
Suicide looks like the best or only choice for them. We can’t stop all of the hardships of their lives, but suicide prevention has to include making better mental health care more available.

How to help yourself and your loved ones get better mental health care:

Learn the warning signs of depression.

If the depression is mild and not upsetting sleep, appetite, concentration or irritability, look for a licensed counselor, social worker or psychologist.
If there are any of the following,
frequent crying or anger outbursts, or crying for no reason, or loss of temper at little things
unusual irritability, snappiness, impatience, criticism of others
poor concentration, follow through, or are more easily distracted
avoiding family and friends, saying ‘no’ to most invitations or suggestions
trouble falling asleep, (longer than 20″-30″), staying asleep (should be getting usual sleep or 6-8 hours a night), or sleeping too much ( more than 2 hours longer than usual), or waking up and not getting back to sleep
panic attacks, with physical signs like fast heart beat, shortness of breath, shaking, sweating, dizziness, nausea, chest tightness or chest pain, numbness or tingling in hands or feet
thoughts of death or suicide
new or increased use of alcohol or recreational or prescription drugs
All of the above persons can do counseling, but a person will probably also need someone who can prescribe medication.

Choosing the right Mental Health Professional assures better mental health care for everyone.
Learning more about depression helps you to get better mental health care for yourself and your loved ones. You will pick up on it sooner, and do something about it before it gets disabling.
Thoughts of suicide don’t usually come on suddenly, so noticing depression early and getting help can stop a lot of suffering. Spread the word, help stop the epidemic of suicide.
Of course, suicidal thoughts or attempts always deserve immediate attention.
If you are currently suicidal, please call 911, your local suicide hotline or one of the national suicide hotlines at 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK

Looking for Light in the Mental Health Care Wilderness

Paul Raeburn writes poignantly of his experiences as a father helping raise three children, two of whom suffer from mental illness-a son with bipolar disorder and a daughter with depression. His account will elicit a shudder of recognition from clinicians with institutional or agency experience and will resonate with the many parents struggling to get help for distressed children from managed care and the medical profession.

Raeburn’s son Alex, a fifth grader, “detonated” one day upon learning that his art lesson had been cancelled. Screaming in fury, he ran through the halls at school, smashing the glass on a clock with his fist, barreling through the front door, and leading the school staff and police officers on a chase through the neighborhood. The cops wrestled him down, yelling, punching, and kicking, packed him into a squad car, and drove away.

The accounts of this incident and of the many that follow are replete with details familiar to those who work with bipolar children:

seizurelike rages that give way to exhaustion, sleep, and a subsequent total lack of recall
agitated or rambunctious behavior in class
oppositionality and reckless defiance
risky and rebellious impulsivity
threats to kill
a mysterious decline in academic abilities despite superior intelligence
dark, brooding malevolence interspersed with creativity, brilliance, and sweetness

With the skepticism of a veteran observer, Raeburn traces the family’s journey through a maze of hospitals, physicians, therapists, and medication cocktails. Just as age, maturity, and possibly blind luck seem finally to be allowing Alex to regroup, the Raeburns’ daughter, Alicia, then in sixth grade, becomes symptomatic and is found to be swallowing handfuls of pills and cutting herself. Once again the family is driven back to the hospitals and practitioners who worked with Alex.

Through the years the Raeburns continue to find the results of treatment frustrating and at best mixed-a pharmacological cornucopia, substance abuse, involvement with the juvenile justice system, and therapists who blame parenting skills, intramarital conflict, and, in Alicia’s case, the trauma of rape rather than brain chemistry. Perhaps inevitably, given the severity of the stressors, the Raeburns’ marriage dissolves. The parents go their separate ways. Raeburn writes unflinchingly about the loss of his marriage and his own experience of psychotherapy.

Formerly a senior writer and editor at Business Week with years of experience covering science and medicine, Raeburn is no stranger to research. He has mined his family’s medical records and has interviewed-and quotes-not only Alex and Alicia but also their brother, Matt, and other parents and children. He writes:

As I began the research for this book, I became increasingly aware of the scandalous disregard with which we treat our mentally ill children. Children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders are among the most neglected and mistreated members of our society. Of the millions of American children with emotional problems, only one in five receives any medical care… But the problems with mental health care cut across the economic spectrum… Treatment of children’s psychiatric disorders is often abysmal. The diagnosis is missed. The children are given the wrong drugs, or the right drugs in the wrong doses. They are offered little or nothing in the way of counseling and psychotherapy. They are admitted to psychiatric hospitals repeatedly, and discharged under the orders of insurance companies after only a few days or a week, long before a diagnosis can be made or an effective treatment established. Many of the few children receiving care lose it abruptly when their insurance runs out, which happens much sooner for mental illness than it does for diabetes, heart disease, or any other ailment. Some parents are forced to give up their jobs to become full-time care managers for their children. Some lose their jobs, because they can’t get their work done while they are being called away to emergency rooms, school classrooms, police stations, hospitals, and juvenile detention centers to attend to their children.

Convulsed by the torment of their children’s illnesses, many parents attempt to conceal their struggle and out of shame or embarrassment. But as Raeburn so accurately observes, the medical system and the nation are failing us all. The suffering of sick children amounts to a public health crisis that demands attention: “The longer the epidemic remains hidden, the longer it will continue.”

This wise and informed account of the horrors of medical care for mental illness among some of our youngest citizens and their families is must reading for mental health professionals and parents with troubled children. “What we found,” Raeburn says, “was a splintered, chaotic mental health system that seemed to do more harm than good.” Many therapists will readily agree. Now is the time for us social workers, parents, and ordinary Americans to take action. By failing to respond to the needs of the nation’s children, after all, we jeopardize our collective future. In the process, we disrespect the children we once were.

Enjoy Darjeeling Green Tea For The Wellness Of Human Health

Green tea, especially from Darjeeling, is a very popular beverage and a powerful antioxidant too. The world of today has embraced this healthy beverage for its stimulating health benefits. In India, there are green blends from Darjeeling and Assam, each having their own variations due to difference in climatic conditions. Green blends from the Himalayan region of Darjeeling have a unique flavor and aroma and instantly boost one’s energy level.

To add to its goodness, this hilly plantations use organic methods of cultivating this beverage. Organic Darjeeling green tea is unique of its kind and contributes significantly to wellness of human health.

What are different ways to consume green brews?

Does the question seem strange? Well, people commonly know green blends in the form of beverage – a cup of golden liquor. When consumed in this typical form, the drinker has to brew or steep it to enjoy its liquid extract to the fullest. However, there are other ways of consuming the green leaves. It is available as dietary supplements in the form of capsules or in some form of decaffeinated supplements.

How does it contribute to human health?

A cup of green brew can help an individual stay healthy in a number of ways.

Boost up immune system

Green blends are rich in polyphenols and hence, act as powerful antioxidants. As a result, it boosts up the immunity system and block damages to DNA. There is also an antigen in this blend which supports the immune system and therefore, keeps individuals safe from diseases.

Diabetics prevention

Studies have proved that people consuming green tea in a moderate amount can prevent themselves from Type 2 Diabetics. Organic Darjeeling green brews also improve cardiac health and vision. Thus, they can help avoid diabetics in a number of ways.

Enhance metabolism system

Caffeine content in tea is relatively low. So, it helps in improving blood circulation in brain without increasing heart functioning at a rapid rate. Faster metabolism will help in burning excess fat, remove lethargy and improve functioning of different organs.

Improves health of digestive tract

For people suffering from gastric and intestinal problems, tea is highly beneficial. It assists in maintaining a healthy intestine. Regular consumption of green blends leads to faster metabolism which in turn removes constipation problem.

So, from now on, switch to biodynamic Darjeeling green tea to maintain good health and at the same time, retain the habit of drinking quality beverage. Get into the habit of drinking green blends.

Controlling Your Health Care Costs in Retirement

It’s no secret that health care becomes a bigger concern for most of us as we grow older. More ailments are likely to develop, which means more money spent to visit health professionals and buy medication. Even if you remain healthy through your later years, the costs of preventative care and preparing for potential unexpected health situations are rising.

Health-related expenses will likely be one of the biggest components of your retirement budget. You need to be prepared to pay for comprehensive insurance coverage and potential out-of-pocket costs for care. Here are three strategies to help you manage this critical expense in retirement.

Understand how Medicare works

The good news for Americans age 65 and older is that you qualify for Medicare. That makes increased dependence on health care services more affordable. At age 65, most people automatically qualify for Medicare Part A at no cost, which primarily provides coverage for hospital stays and skilled nursing care. Medicare Part B must be purchased (approximately $109 per month in 2017 for most retirees). Part B covers the costs of visiting a physician, but with some deductibles. Many people purchase additional coverage to use for out-of-pocket expenses, such as a Part D prescription drug plan or a Medicare Supplement policy.

With Medicare, timing is important. Signing up when you first qualify for coverage will keep costs at the lowest level. If you maintain insurance through your employer after turning 65, you can delay Medicare enrollment without risking late penalties.

If you retire prior to age 65, you will need to purchase insurance on the open market to cover health-related expenses until you become eligible for Medicare. Individual coverage tends to get more expensive as you grow older, so work the cost into your retirement budget. Some employers offer retiree health insurance as a benefit. Check with your human resources department to see if this option is available to you.

Allocate sufficient funds for health care costs

As you develop your retirement income strategy, make sure you have money set aside for health expenses that will be your responsibility. By one estimate, the average 66-year-old couple will need to tap more than half of their lifetime pre-tax Social Security benefits to pay for health care expenses throughout retirement. Most people will likely have to rely, in part, on their own savings to help offset some medical expenses.

Along with other retirement savings, you may want to establish a health savings account (HSA) during your working years. HSAs are designed to help build tax-advantaged savings to pay for out-of-pocket medical expenses you incur during your working years. However, any leftover funds can be applied to health expenses later in life, including premiums for Medicare and long-term care insurance. Keep in mind that you must be enrolled in a high deductible health plan to open an HSA.

Focus on your own health

One way to potentially keep health care costs under control in retirement is to create or maintain a healthy lifestyle. Small changes you make today, such as eating right or prioritizing sleep, could reduce the likelihood that medical issues will impact you later in life. Being physically active may also benefit your finances in retirement – according to the American Heart Association, it could potentially help you save $500 a year today on health-related expenses.

Proper Nutrition and Good Health With Mineral Supplements

The value of getting an adequate amount of minerals to our body to maintain our overall health cannot be stressed enough. Having enough mineral levels in our body provides a wide variety of health benefits while having mineral deficiencies results to a wide variety of conditions including death in severe cases. Minerals take part in nerve transmission, muscle contraction, cell permeability, tissue structure, blood formation, acid-base balance, fluid regulation, blood pressure control, protein metabolism and energy production. With the decrease of mineral levels on the food we eat and increase on pollutions and vices now more than ever we need supplements.

Minerals are key components of our body it is a major factor on maintaining good health and preventing various health problems. What most people don’t understand is that minerals have an effect on almost every capability in our body we need them for all chemical process that goes on inside us. Minerals offer a great number of health benefits to our body which it needs to ensure optimal health.

Minerals are inorganic nutrients, which mean that the body cannot make them. Instead, they can only be supplied to the body through selection of foods such as:

Meat, cereals
Fish
Milk and dairy foods
Vegetables
Fruit (especially dried fruit)
Nuts
As well as through mineral supplements.

Health Supplements that our body needs

Mineral Deficiency occurs when there is lack or low levels of minerals which are important for our bodies growth and health and fitness. The most significant minerals that our body needs are calcium, potassium, magnesium and zinc without the proper amount of these minerals our body will have difficulty performing its daily functions.

Examples on how mineral supplements will be able to help you with.

The human body needs Calcium more than any other mineral this is because of the many important functions performed by Calcium in the human body. Calcium supplements will help work the hormones and glands better, prevent you from being overweight and keep your blood pressure in check.

Potassium is the major positive ion (cation) found inside of cells. Potassium Deficiency (Hypokalemia) is commonly caused by inadequate potassium intake and heavy fluid losses that “flush” potassium out of the body. Feeling fatigued, rhythm disturbances and palpitations of the heart and problems in digesting are just one of the most common symptoms. Potassium Mineral Supplements will help your body regain or raise the potassium level in your body.

Magnesium is a mineral substance in our body that contributes in absorption of calcium and building healthy bones and teeth. People suffering from osteoporosis are instructed by health experts to increase the magnesium levels in their body by eating foods with magnesium content and by taking mineral supplements to increase it.

Men needs to increase their zinc levels more than women, due to the very high concentration of zinc in sperm their zinc levels are depleted every time they have sex.

With busy work life and tempting fast foods it’s hard to keep up with what our body needs this is why more and more people are taking supplements to meet the daily required amounts of minerals in their body. Again I would urge you to consult with a doctor and/or a dietitian before proceeding to taking mineral supplements over dosage can create a lot more health problems for you and this is more common than you think, so know your proper dosage and find out what mineral supplements your body needs.

Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits of Rice

Rice has a number of health benefits, which are often overlooked. When we think about rice the first thing that comes to our mind is that it is loaded with carbohydrates. But rice is not just carbohydrates; it is an essential source of vitamin B1 too. It can provide fast and instant energy, normalize and improve bowel movements, and stabilize blood sugar levels.

Ask any body builder and he would recommend eating rice over wheat-based rotis. This is because rice can increase the metabolism and help digestion.

It can also give a boost to your skin health, aid weight loss, reduce high blood pressure, improve the immune system and provide protection against cardiovascular diseases, cancer and dysentery.

Rice is inexpensive and is a staple diet in many counties. There are 40,000 varieties of rice available throughout the world. The two main categories are white rice and whole grain rice.

Here are some of the nutrition facts and health benefits of rice.

Great source of energy: Carbohydrates acts as a fuel for the body, and rice is rich in carbohydrates. It aids in the normal functioning of the brain.

Cholesterol free: Rice is devoid of cholesterol, harmful fats, or sodium. It forms an integral part of a balanced diet. It also helps reduce obesity and is one of the most widely eaten foods in the world.

Blood pressure management: It is low in sodium and can lower blood pressure. Sodium can cause veins and arteries to tighten, increasing the stress and strain on the cardiovascular system as the blood pressure increases. It can lead to heart attacks, and strokes.

Cancer prevention: To prevent cancer, eat brown rice or wholegrain rice. They are rich in insoluble fibre that can guard against different types of cancer, especially intestinal cancer. Besides fibre, rice also has natural antioxidants like flavonoid compounds, vitamin C, phenolic and vitamin-A.

Skin care: Research shows that powdered rice can cure certain skin ailments. It has anti-inflammatory properties, so it is also good for redness and any type of skin irritation. To reduce wrinkles and other premature signs of ageing, make rice a daily part of your diet. This is because rice is rich in antioxidants and can give a beauty boost to your skin.

Alzheimer’s Disease: Brown rice contains nutrients in high level that aids the growth of neuro-protective enzymes in the brain and helps prevent Alzheimer’s disease.

Diuretic and digestive qualities: Rice significantly improves appetite, and lessens all problems related to the digestive system. Rice husk, being a diuretic, can help eliminate toxins from the body, and even aid weight loss. It increases bowel movement regularity as it is rich in fibre content and guards against various types of cancer.

Rich in vitamins: It is an excellent source of vitamins and minerals like vitamin D, niacin, fibre, calcium, iron, riboflavin and thiamine. These vitamins are essential to prevent diseases and boost our immune system. They are also essential for body metabolism, and general functioning of the organ systems.

How Sleep Affects Mental Health and Wellness

There is still much to be known about the link between mental health and sleep, but sleep being a basic foundation of well-being means it can have a certain degree of impact on your mental wellness and capability. A good night’s sleep – just like a healthful diet and lifestyle – is deemed crucial in fostering mental and emotional resilience, with chronic sleep issues feared to set the stage for negative mood and thinking, anxiety, and depression.

Think about it: you absorb new information every day of your life. With sleep, you are able to have the luxury of “down time” to process all these different bits and pieces of information, and then store it in your memory bank. This way they are all available when you need them. Sleep is therefore creative for improving not just concentration but also learning and creativity.

What happens to the mental aspect when you are faced with chronic sleeplessness or insomnia? Here are some of the potential adverse effects:

Your mind may slow down – Did you know that just one night of having inadequate sleep can massively impact your attention span, alertness, concentration, and ability to solve problems? Those who regularly find it hard to sleep could have impaired intelligence and mental development.
Your memory may be less optimal – While you sleep, the things you have learned and experienced during the day are thoughts to be organized or “filed” in your mind properly for future use and access. Now, if you are not getting enough sleep you would have trouble remembering what you go through today.
You may become depressed – Insomnia has been associated with the development of depression. According to some studies, people who regularly reported being unable to sleep were five times more likely to show depression symptoms. It remains unclear, again, where depression was the byproduct of sleeplessness or vice versa. Regardless of this, getting an optimal amount of sleep is considered important in treating this disorder.
You may become less smart – If you don’t get enough sleep, your performance in tasks that use the brain – such as tests or complex projects at work – may suffer. A full night’s sleep, the vital piece of the mental health puzzle that it is, organizes and makes connections within your mind to the information you obtained during the day. Without it, you may have a hard time retrieving those details for school or work the next day.
Your happiness levels may be affected – Sleep lets your brain have the time it needs to properly get into balance the chemicals and hormones affecting mental clarity, emotions, and mood – the bigger context that makes it possible for you to be relaxed, calm, and happy.

There are different ways you may achieve improved sleep. You need to tweak your sleep habits first, following a regular bedtime and waking time schedule and routine, as well as avoiding stimulants like blue light from gadgets and unnecessary noise. If you feel you are in need of greater intervention, it is best to talk to your doctor, sleep psychologist, or an expert who can get to the bottom of your sleeplessness and recommended effective natural sleep remedies.